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Fresh suicide

Fresh suicide - Short Film by Anupam Barve Receives as critical acclaim
Anupam Barve is an avid film buff from Pune, India. After a brief detour to science college, he opted to complete a graduation in Performing Arts. Before moving to London t pursue a career in film direction, he spent a few years doing drama, making documentaries and running an environmental organisation called TekdiPune.
Quote:
"Fresh Suicide is semi-autobiographical. As a final project film on the MA in Film Direction course at the University of Westminster, I wanted to make a film which was mine, which came out of my own identity and awareness. I have been in this situation as Anurag in the film. It is very personal. We all know how insensitive media is about such issues, but what is more disturbing is the way western media looks at these matters. It is also very disturbing to see how we still look up to the white skin. It is also about the young urban India getting sandwiched between Western Culture and one's own roots. Especially when he/she finds he is detached from both."
Synopsis
Fresh Suicide is a realistic portrayal of a young Indian translator working with an American journalist, who is doing a photo feature on farmers' suicides in rural India. In the process of looking out for a recent suicide case, he is sandwiched between his duty and sensitivity, aggressive Western journalism and the disturbing colonial hangover that still looms over most of rural India.

News

Fresh suicide

<p> Fresh suicide - Short Film by Anupam Barve Receives as critical acclaim<br /> Anupam Barve is an avid film buff from Pune, India. After a brief detour to science college, he opted to complete a graduation in <a href="http://finearts.tumbhi.com/?_ga=1.185954604.485890034.1445283230">Performing Arts</a>. Before moving to London t pursue a career in film direction, he spent a few years doing drama, making documentaries and running an environmental organisation called TekdiPune.<br /> Quote:<br /> "Fresh Suicide is semi-autobiographical. As a final project film on the MA in Film Direction course at the University of Westminster, I wanted to make a film which was mine, which came out of my own identity and awareness. I have been in this situation as Anurag in the film. It is very personal. We all know how insensitive media is about such issues, but what is more disturbing is the way western media looks at these matters. It is also very disturbing to see how we still look up to the white skin. It is also about the young urban India getting sandwiched between Western Culture and one's own roots. Especially when he/she finds he is detached from both."<br /> Synopsis<br /> Fresh Suicide is a realistic portrayal of a young Indian translator working with an American journalist, who is doing a photo feature on farmers' suicides in rural India. In the process of looking out for a recent suicide case, he is sandwiched between his duty and sensitivity, aggressive Western journalism and the disturbing colonial hangover that still looms over most of rural India.</p>

<p> Fresh suicide - Short Film by Anupam Barve Receives as critical acclaim<br /> Anupam Barve is an avid film buff from Pune, India. After a brief detour to science college, he opted to complete a graduation in <a href="http://finearts.tumbhi.com/?_ga=1.185954604.485890034.1445283230">Performing Arts</a>. Before moving to London t pursue a career in film direction, he spent a few years doing drama, making documentaries and running an environmental organisation called TekdiPune.<br /> Quote:<br /> "Fresh Suicide is semi-autobiographical. As a final project film on the MA in Film Direction course at the University of Westminster, I wanted to make a film which was mine, which came out of my own identity and awareness. I have been in this situation as Anurag in the film. It is very personal. We all know how insensitive media is about such issues, but what is more disturbing is the way western media looks at these matters. It is also very disturbing to see how we still look up to the white skin. It is also about the young urban India getting sandwiched between Western Culture and one's own roots. Especially when he/she finds he is detached from both."<br /> Synopsis<br /> Fresh Suicide is a realistic portrayal of a young Indian translator working with an American journalist, who is doing a photo feature on farmers' suicides in rural India. In the process of looking out for a recent suicide case, he is sandwiched between his duty and sensitivity, aggressive Western journalism and the disturbing colonial hangover that still looms over most of rural India.</p>

Fresh suicide - Short Film by Anupam Barve Receives as critical acclaim Anupam Barve is an avid..

Shor: My First Short Film with Tumbhi and Anurag K

<p> I read this research snippet about a woman doing a research on the influence of hormones on relationships. A part of the research involved the woman standing on an empty street asking out men for a date. She asked over 20 men. Her success rate was 40%. She did the same thing on a dangling bridge on a rough weather day. Her success rate jumped to about 85%. Though the static may not be exact but the hypothesis that she arrived at was that people are vulnerable to fall in love in dangerous situations. I had forgotten the article but it stuck in my subconscious and eventually led to an idea about the human condition at the face of death. When we embrace death, our most vulnerable time, we find our truest side. We confront what really matters to us. That became the basis for Shor. Yes, I wasn’t too happy with the title myself but when you see the film you’ll realize we couldn’t have come up with another name.<br /> Shor is about Lallan and Meena, a couple from Banaras (North India), consumed by their pursuit to survive in the seedy ghettos of Mumbai city. Lallan has lost his job at the factory and ambles about hopelessly searching for a way out. Meena has taken up tailoring to make ends meet, losing touch with her emotions, and almost turning into a machine herself. One day they truly find each other while embracing death, divorce and redemption, all just over a phone call.<br /> I had the basic structure of the script ready but I didn’t want to compromise with the culture and milieu of the characters. For me it is very essential to have the premise to adhere to a agreed upon set of culture and ethos. I used to take autorickshaw rides and speak to the drivers at length, recording the conversation on my phone and later make notes from it. I must have spoken to some 40 odd rickshaw drivers to arrive at 4 of them who were from Banaras. I conducted a focus group with these people, inviting them to my house. Yes yes, I have an academic and corporate background and old habits die hard. Anyway, I spoke to them for a long time about their lives, their homes, how they dealt with their wives, I made them call their wives and understand how they spoke to them in crisis etc. Finally, I wrote the script along with dialogue. I was very scared and excited. It was ready and I had to show it to Anurag ( I was assisting him on Wasseypur). It’s like you are going for an appraisal interview to your boss. He read the first page and rejected it. He didn’t read further and I was heartbroken. I felt terrible, this was not just a short film script, but my first work to my boss and he had rejected it. Some people rubbed it in. I almost felt like abandoning the whole idea of becoming a filmmaker. It was humiliating. I thought I should still do this.<br /> I called my rickshawala brotherhood. I decided to go to their homes. Some of them were kind enough to oblige. I spent time at their place; observing their lifestyle, the objects in their houses, the kids, the neighborhood, what they did in their free time, what pained them, what made them happy etc. It helped in understanding their lifestyle and most importantly what language they spoke. Now that I had enough material, I started rewriting the dialogues. When you start writing dialogues, you realize how difficult is writing a screenplay as against a book or a short story. The research helped me in identifying the insecurities that they lived with and how they expressed themselves. I wrote a draft and ran it past Vineet Singh (the lead actor of Shor) and Varun Grover ( a writer friend). They made some tone and grammar corrections with the dialogue I wrote. By the way, Vineet Singh has the fine charm of the angry young man and I have lost the count of how many languages he knows. Finally Anurag read the script. He said it has great potential if I had established the two characters in the same space. He had couple of ideas. I put everything together but didn’t show the final draft which by the way, was the tenth draft.<br /> I just wanted to go ahead and shoot. The more I deliberated the more I’d distance from the passion to make it. Also, there was this pressure of having assisted for only six months and here I was, attempting to make a difficult short film in complete guerrilla style. The folks at Tumbhi.com loved the script and I was ready to go. But there was one problem; the shooting process could only be started in August along with the competing short films, which was completely understandable. But I couldn’t have shot in the monsoons as the film was mostly in difficult exterior locations. So I borrowed money from friends for the shoot (Thank You Anubhuti Kashyap and Suresh Nayak). We got into pre-production, Rishabh and Puja jumped into help me on the film. Rishabh was great help on the locations and convincing people for the shoot.  Puja is responsible for the look  and the costumes. Poor her, she had to stay away from the action for all the work. They have really worked hard during the film. Super line producer Deep Singh came on board. We did the shot breakdowns, location recces and the research for costume, art and the train routes and stations. Mukesh Chhabra unconditionally helped me to understand what to look for while casting actors. He even did couple of auditions for me.<br /> Without the guerrilla style, the film could have easily become one of the most expensive short films in India. More than the saving, it gave us the freedom of canning the shots exactly the way we wanted. The authorities would have never allowed us to take certain shots if we had shot with permissions. Honestly, if we were caught, we all would have been in jail. To avoid that, we made rules. No three people will be seen together, video assist was avoided. As much as I wanted it, we didn’t take the boom mike. We managed to shoot in sync sound with couple of lapels and a mini sound recorder for ambience. Every location we would find a make-shift base and hide whenever cops or some authorities would come around. I can’t thank Vineet and Ratnabali enough for their courage and conviction. They both risked their lives while shooting for Shor.<br /> Post production took way longer than I had anticipated. I am working on the post-production of Wasseypur and I made Shor in between all the running around for Wasseypur. That was the most difficult part. I had to teleport myself from one studio to another studio, one film to another. Both films were equally close to my heart and it was difficult juggling and two timing. Thankfully, I had a great editor in Nitin Baid. I was handling post and he was assisting the head editor,Shweta Venkat for Wasseypur. They are a lovely team to work with. For few days, when I ran out of money for studios, Shweta loaned her macbook to me and also allowed Nitin to work on Shor while working on Wasseypur. It was great help. Zahir Bandukwala designed the sound and Suhaas Ahuja (You will soon experience their work in That Girl In Yellow Boots). We did a 5.1 surround mix for sound and think it really is achievement by the sound team to pull of sync sound in such difficult locations . Vijesh Rajan, is a bundle of joy to work with. He did the VFX, color correction ( made a DSLR short film look like a film)  and the titles. He also made the poster.<br /> I don’t know which filmmaker said this that the biggest task for a filmmaker is to assemble a great team which is excited about the project. That’s what worked for me the most. All of this was possible through http://www.tumbhi.com. Most of the cast and crew were found on their portal. It’s a great platform to discover talent from all corners of India. I am eternally indebted to Tumbhi.com for not only funding the project but also to give us a platform to make this happen. Above all, thanks Anurag! I owe this to you.</p>

<p> I read this research snippet about a woman doing a research on the influence of hormones on relationships. A part of the research involved the woman standing on an empty street asking out men for a date. She asked over 20 men. Her success rate was 40%. She did the same thing on a dangling bridge on a rough weather day. Her success rate jumped to about 85%. Though the static may not be exact but the hypothesis that she arrived at was that people are vulnerable to fall in love in dangerous situations. I had forgotten the article but it stuck in my subconscious and eventually led to an idea about the human condition at the face of death. When we embrace death, our most vulnerable time, we find our truest side. We confront what really matters to us. That became the basis for Shor. Yes, I wasn’t too happy with the title myself but when you see the film you’ll realize we couldn’t have come up with another name.<br /> Shor is about Lallan and Meena, a couple from Banaras (North India), consumed by their pursuit to survive in the seedy ghettos of Mumbai city. Lallan has lost his job at the factory and ambles about hopelessly searching for a way out. Meena has taken up tailoring to make ends meet, losing touch with her emotions, and almost turning into a machine herself. One day they truly find each other while embracing death, divorce and redemption, all just over a phone call.<br /> I had the basic structure of the script ready but I didn’t want to compromise with the culture and milieu of the characters. For me it is very essential to have the premise to adhere to a agreed upon set of culture and ethos. I used to take autorickshaw rides and speak to the drivers at length, recording the conversation on my phone and later make notes from it. I must have spoken to some 40 odd rickshaw drivers to arrive at 4 of them who were from Banaras. I conducted a focus group with these people, inviting them to my house. Yes yes, I have an academic and corporate background and old habits die hard. Anyway, I spoke to them for a long time about their lives, their homes, how they dealt with their wives, I made them call their wives and understand how they spoke to them in crisis etc. Finally, I wrote the script along with dialogue. I was very scared and excited. It was ready and I had to show it to Anurag ( I was assisting him on Wasseypur). It’s like you are going for an appraisal interview to your boss. He read the first page and rejected it. He didn’t read further and I was heartbroken. I felt terrible, this was not just a short film script, but my first work to my boss and he had rejected it. Some people rubbed it in. I almost felt like abandoning the whole idea of becoming a filmmaker. It was humiliating. I thought I should still do this.<br /> I called my rickshawala brotherhood. I decided to go to their homes. Some of them were kind enough to oblige. I spent time at their place; observing their lifestyle, the objects in their houses, the kids, the neighborhood, what they did in their free time, what pained them, what made them happy etc. It helped in understanding their lifestyle and most importantly what language they spoke. Now that I had enough material, I started rewriting the dialogues. When you start writing dialogues, you realize how difficult is writing a screenplay as against a book or a short story. The research helped me in identifying the insecurities that they lived with and how they expressed themselves. I wrote a draft and ran it past Vineet Singh (the lead actor of Shor) and Varun Grover ( a writer friend). They made some tone and grammar corrections with the dialogue I wrote. By the way, Vineet Singh has the fine charm of the angry young man and I have lost the count of how many languages he knows. Finally Anurag read the script. He said it has great potential if I had established the two characters in the same space. He had couple of ideas. I put everything together but didn’t show the final draft which by the way, was the tenth draft.<br /> I just wanted to go ahead and shoot. The more I deliberated the more I’d distance from the passion to make it. Also, there was this pressure of having assisted for only six months and here I was, attempting to make a difficult short film in complete guerrilla style. The folks at Tumbhi.com loved the script and I was ready to go. But there was one problem; the shooting process could only be started in August along with the competing short films, which was completely understandable. But I couldn’t have shot in the monsoons as the film was mostly in difficult exterior locations. So I borrowed money from friends for the shoot (Thank You Anubhuti Kashyap and Suresh Nayak). We got into pre-production, Rishabh and Puja jumped into help me on the film. Rishabh was great help on the locations and convincing people for the shoot.  Puja is responsible for the look  and the costumes. Poor her, she had to stay away from the action for all the work. They have really worked hard during the film. Super line producer Deep Singh came on board. We did the shot breakdowns, location recces and the research for costume, art and the train routes and stations. Mukesh Chhabra unconditionally helped me to understand what to look for while casting actors. He even did couple of auditions for me.<br /> Without the guerrilla style, the film could have easily become one of the most expensive short films in India. More than the saving, it gave us the freedom of canning the shots exactly the way we wanted. The authorities would have never allowed us to take certain shots if we had shot with permissions. Honestly, if we were caught, we all would have been in jail. To avoid that, we made rules. No three people will be seen together, video assist was avoided. As much as I wanted it, we didn’t take the boom mike. We managed to shoot in sync sound with couple of lapels and a mini sound recorder for ambience. Every location we would find a make-shift base and hide whenever cops or some authorities would come around. I can’t thank Vineet and Ratnabali enough for their courage and conviction. They both risked their lives while shooting for Shor.<br /> Post production took way longer than I had anticipated. I am working on the post-production of Wasseypur and I made Shor in between all the running around for Wasseypur. That was the most difficult part. I had to teleport myself from one studio to another studio, one film to another. Both films were equally close to my heart and it was difficult juggling and two timing. Thankfully, I had a great editor in Nitin Baid. I was handling post and he was assisting the head editor,Shweta Venkat for Wasseypur. They are a lovely team to work with. For few days, when I ran out of money for studios, Shweta loaned her macbook to me and also allowed Nitin to work on Shor while working on Wasseypur. It was great help. Zahir Bandukwala designed the sound and Suhaas Ahuja (You will soon experience their work in That Girl In Yellow Boots). We did a 5.1 surround mix for sound and think it really is achievement by the sound team to pull of sync sound in such difficult locations . Vijesh Rajan, is a bundle of joy to work with. He did the VFX, color correction ( made a DSLR short film look like a film)  and the titles. He also made the poster.<br /> I don’t know which filmmaker said this that the biggest task for a filmmaker is to assemble a great team which is excited about the project. That’s what worked for me the most. All of this was possible through http://www.tumbhi.com. Most of the cast and crew were found on their portal. It’s a great platform to discover talent from all corners of India. I am eternally indebted to Tumbhi.com for not only funding the project but also to give us a platform to make this happen. Above all, thanks Anurag! I owe this to you.</p>

I read this research snippet about a woman doing a research on the influence of hormones on..

DEO’s Delhi Belly the new cult film in Bollywood

<p> Director Abhinay Deo is well known in the entertainment circuit as he has directed over 250 advertisements which include Cadburys (girl in the stadium), Nike (cricket on top of vehicles on a busy street) and Pepsi (with Deepika Padukone, Ranbir Kapoor and Shah Rukh Khan). He then moved on to do feature films. The young director made his debut in Hindi cinema with the Abhishek Bachchan starrer Game; however Game was actually his second film. Delhi Belly was his first full-length film as director. The comedy was shot in 2008/2009 and was completed even before Game began, but was delayed for release.<br /> Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels. This 1998 Guy Ritchie flick has inspired scores of films across the globe; Delhi Belly is today’s adaptation. NO, IT IS NOT A COPY! But you can’t help think of Lock, Stock during viewing Delhi Belly. Just like you will think of The Godfather while watching any organized crime movie! Produced by Aamir Khan, Delhi Belly stars Imran Khan, Vir Das and Kunal Roy Kapoor and is an “irreverent and fun film” according to Deo. It was selected as the opening film of The London Indian Film Festival 2011.<br /> Abhinav Deo has become the new poster boy of Bollywood. Delhi Belly, which he has directed, has kind of become a cult film. Viewers can expect many lookalikes and inspirations in the days to come, complete with in-your-face attitude, expletives and provocative lyrics. But then, Deo has celluloid in his DNA. His name means acting in Hindi. His parents, Ramesh and Seema Deo, are well-known Marathi actors, who did a number of Hindi films too, always together, in the 1970s. And, till Delhi Belly happened, he was an unsuccessful director because his first film, Game, had sunk without a trace.<br /> But Delhi Belly changed a movie that was made keeping the next Gen Indian youth in mind. With no precedence of such a dead pan comedy ever made the bigger challenge for Abhinav was to get the actors tuned into the deadpan stuff because they are not used to that. To make it even tougher, the basic language of the film was in English, so that made it even worse. According to Abhinav the irreverence of the film is the best thing about the film.<br /> Abhinav a workaholic graduated as an architect, but knew story-telling was calling him. After almost 14 years of directing ad-films, he successfully brought the visual sense and detailing that he mastered in the advertising world to his films. Deo, like other ad-film-maker-turned-feature-film directors such as R Balki, John Mathew Mathan, Dibakar Banerjee and Pradeep Sarkar, believes that the real art lies in telling a story in 10-seconds. Some ad-men have made the transition to films successfully; many others have failed. The criticism is that these directors lacked the skill to give soul to a feature film. Deo may have to do more than Delhi Belly to prove the detractors wrong. Bollywood is full of directors who turned out to be one-film wonders but a cult film like Delhi Belly under his belly he is definitely off to a flying start.</p>

<p> Director Abhinay Deo is well known in the entertainment circuit as he has directed over 250 advertisements which include Cadburys (girl in the stadium), Nike (cricket on top of vehicles on a busy street) and Pepsi (with Deepika Padukone, Ranbir Kapoor and Shah Rukh Khan). He then moved on to do feature films. The young director made his debut in Hindi cinema with the Abhishek Bachchan starrer Game; however Game was actually his second film. Delhi Belly was his first full-length film as director. The comedy was shot in 2008/2009 and was completed even before Game began, but was delayed for release.<br /> Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels. This 1998 Guy Ritchie flick has inspired scores of films across the globe; Delhi Belly is today’s adaptation. NO, IT IS NOT A COPY! But you can’t help think of Lock, Stock during viewing Delhi Belly. Just like you will think of The Godfather while watching any organized crime movie! Produced by Aamir Khan, Delhi Belly stars Imran Khan, Vir Das and Kunal Roy Kapoor and is an “irreverent and fun film” according to Deo. It was selected as the opening film of The London Indian Film Festival 2011.<br /> Abhinav Deo has become the new poster boy of Bollywood. Delhi Belly, which he has directed, has kind of become a cult film. Viewers can expect many lookalikes and inspirations in the days to come, complete with in-your-face attitude, expletives and provocative lyrics. But then, Deo has celluloid in his DNA. His name means acting in Hindi. His parents, Ramesh and Seema Deo, are well-known Marathi actors, who did a number of Hindi films too, always together, in the 1970s. And, till Delhi Belly happened, he was an unsuccessful director because his first film, Game, had sunk without a trace.<br /> But Delhi Belly changed a movie that was made keeping the next Gen Indian youth in mind. With no precedence of such a dead pan comedy ever made the bigger challenge for Abhinav was to get the actors tuned into the deadpan stuff because they are not used to that. To make it even tougher, the basic language of the film was in English, so that made it even worse. According to Abhinav the irreverence of the film is the best thing about the film.<br /> Abhinav a workaholic graduated as an architect, but knew story-telling was calling him. After almost 14 years of directing ad-films, he successfully brought the visual sense and detailing that he mastered in the advertising world to his films. Deo, like other ad-film-maker-turned-feature-film directors such as R Balki, John Mathew Mathan, Dibakar Banerjee and Pradeep Sarkar, believes that the real art lies in telling a story in 10-seconds. Some ad-men have made the transition to films successfully; many others have failed. The criticism is that these directors lacked the skill to give soul to a feature film. Deo may have to do more than Delhi Belly to prove the detractors wrong. Bollywood is full of directors who turned out to be one-film wonders but a cult film like Delhi Belly under his belly he is definitely off to a flying start.</p>

Director Abhinay Deo is well known in the entertainment circuit as he has directed over 250..

Once there used to be film critics.

<p> Cinematorium<br /> Pankaj Shukla<br /> Having stopped reviewing films on weekly basis long back, I hardly have an urge to watch each and every movie first day first show now. Friday noon or Thursday evenings used to be booked for a film in my weekly schedules for almost a decade then and no matter what, be it rain, the thunderstorms or the scorching heat, I had to be there to see a new film. Sometimes the time used to pass by with an entertaining film, sometimes it was more thoughts than entertainment that used to come to mind and sometimes it were all emotions. But to see a film and then curse the self for wasting more than two hours of life on a trash used to be a case once in a quarter. Even flop films till sometimes back had a sense and something or the other in their making had some magic to keep you intact.<br /> Nowadays in the time of celebration of corrupts, Film reviews too have fallen in the hands of marketing people in the dailies of most of the newspapers in India. Any person who dares to judge a film by his or her gut is sure to be crucified with so called Gangs of Marketing Men. They are modern Men In Black who are out to write the new rules of journalism and their over enthusiasm to milk producers have taken a heavy toll on ethical film journalism. Last year only when I was sitting with a close friend and one of the top most film distributors of Northern India, he cursed me for not writing weekly film reviews in a time when critics not only get plasma TV, double door fridges and foreign trip tickets but also their palms are greased well. I was aghast listening this and could only feel ashamed of the fact that the person sitting across the table is making fun of a profession which I almost fell in love. It was like listening someone abuse your darling and you could do nothing.<br /> I don’t know how much truth was in his satire, but if he is wrong then how would a critic will rate a film with one star and other one will go on to give the same film four stars or sometimes even five stars. Not long back, a producer friend of mine wanted to make a film on this film review business and approached me to write a story for the same. I advised him if he wants to make a standing in the film trade, he should keep away from this and better make films on some other topics. Thankfully, he agreed and I was saved in washing dirty clothes of my own fraternity in public. But, now it is becoming above saturation point. It is like a time when somebody needs to stand up and say, Enough.<br /> I liked the reviews of Minty Tejpal off late who used to write in Mumbai Mirror till very recently and may be because of his being true to his heart has cost him his job. His name has vanished from the paper’s weekly film review section. All these thoughts have been occupying much space of mind since the time I came out watching film 3 They Bhai recently. I was so much in praise of its producer Rakeyesh Omprakash Mehra till the time I didn’t see this film. He gave interviews with the headlines, ‘Producers in Hindi Film Industry do not have story sense’. And, he went on record to say that was the only reason he made 3 They Bhai. The headlines seekers gave huge space to Mr. Mehra in their papers. I am certain that he learnt this art from his hero in Rang De Basanti, Aamir Khan. Shout from the top of the highest building in town like Veeru and win Basanti (the viewers). Who cares what happened when Veeru and Basanti left in the train from Ramgadh. The money spent in buying tickets is in the pocket of the producer. His job is done, the viewers can wait for their revenge till his next film. As a producer he is not going to release his next film very soon in near future and it is certain that he will not have to bear the same burnt that Akshay Kumar is still facing post his idiotic comedy Singh Is King.<br /> Gone are the days when writing a film review was deemed as an art. People used to line up to get an admission in film appreciation course, now every Tom, Dick and Harry is a film critic. Those who don’t even heard of plot points and basics of screenplay are the most talkative film critics in any press show. People who have no knowledge of music and its beats praise a shit song like National Anthem of the country. So overawed are these reviewers that they declare even a film like Raavan, a super hit, as soon as you start reading end credits in the theatre itself. One can now count genuine film critics in the country on finger tips, who are not in awe of stars, who don’t look for complementary things, who have no issue in watching a film with their own money than to watch in a press show and feel obliged for hardly 200 bugs. But, do newspapers have space to publish their views any more. The question is Too Boo or not to boo?</p>

<p> Cinematorium<br /> Pankaj Shukla<br /> Having stopped reviewing films on weekly basis long back, I hardly have an urge to watch each and every movie first day first show now. Friday noon or Thursday evenings used to be booked for a film in my weekly schedules for almost a decade then and no matter what, be it rain, the thunderstorms or the scorching heat, I had to be there to see a new film. Sometimes the time used to pass by with an entertaining film, sometimes it was more thoughts than entertainment that used to come to mind and sometimes it were all emotions. But to see a film and then curse the self for wasting more than two hours of life on a trash used to be a case once in a quarter. Even flop films till sometimes back had a sense and something or the other in their making had some magic to keep you intact.<br /> Nowadays in the time of celebration of corrupts, Film reviews too have fallen in the hands of marketing people in the dailies of most of the newspapers in India. Any person who dares to judge a film by his or her gut is sure to be crucified with so called Gangs of Marketing Men. They are modern Men In Black who are out to write the new rules of journalism and their over enthusiasm to milk producers have taken a heavy toll on ethical film journalism. Last year only when I was sitting with a close friend and one of the top most film distributors of Northern India, he cursed me for not writing weekly film reviews in a time when critics not only get plasma TV, double door fridges and foreign trip tickets but also their palms are greased well. I was aghast listening this and could only feel ashamed of the fact that the person sitting across the table is making fun of a profession which I almost fell in love. It was like listening someone abuse your darling and you could do nothing.<br /> I don’t know how much truth was in his satire, but if he is wrong then how would a critic will rate a film with one star and other one will go on to give the same film four stars or sometimes even five stars. Not long back, a producer friend of mine wanted to make a film on this film review business and approached me to write a story for the same. I advised him if he wants to make a standing in the film trade, he should keep away from this and better make films on some other topics. Thankfully, he agreed and I was saved in washing dirty clothes of my own fraternity in public. But, now it is becoming above saturation point. It is like a time when somebody needs to stand up and say, Enough.<br /> I liked the reviews of Minty Tejpal off late who used to write in Mumbai Mirror till very recently and may be because of his being true to his heart has cost him his job. His name has vanished from the paper’s weekly film review section. All these thoughts have been occupying much space of mind since the time I came out watching film 3 They Bhai recently. I was so much in praise of its producer Rakeyesh Omprakash Mehra till the time I didn’t see this film. He gave interviews with the headlines, ‘Producers in Hindi Film Industry do not have story sense’. And, he went on record to say that was the only reason he made 3 They Bhai. The headlines seekers gave huge space to Mr. Mehra in their papers. I am certain that he learnt this art from his hero in Rang De Basanti, Aamir Khan. Shout from the top of the highest building in town like Veeru and win Basanti (the viewers). Who cares what happened when Veeru and Basanti left in the train from Ramgadh. The money spent in buying tickets is in the pocket of the producer. His job is done, the viewers can wait for their revenge till his next film. As a producer he is not going to release his next film very soon in near future and it is certain that he will not have to bear the same burnt that Akshay Kumar is still facing post his idiotic comedy Singh Is King.<br /> Gone are the days when writing a film review was deemed as an art. People used to line up to get an admission in film appreciation course, now every Tom, Dick and Harry is a film critic. Those who don’t even heard of plot points and basics of screenplay are the most talkative film critics in any press show. People who have no knowledge of music and its beats praise a shit song like National Anthem of the country. So overawed are these reviewers that they declare even a film like Raavan, a super hit, as soon as you start reading end credits in the theatre itself. One can now count genuine film critics in the country on finger tips, who are not in awe of stars, who don’t look for complementary things, who have no issue in watching a film with their own money than to watch in a press show and feel obliged for hardly 200 bugs. But, do newspapers have space to publish their views any more. The question is Too Boo or not to boo?</p>

Cinematorium Pankaj Shukla Having stopped reviewing films on weekly basis long back, I hardly..

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